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DRIVING INSTRUCTOR – Your New Career?

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LOGOAn excerpt from a recently received email:

 

“Hi Mike, seems ages since we last spoke and even longer since we shared those instructor training sessions.

In the last ten tears, I have come to realise just how sound and professional your advice was and I attribute in no small part, my part three success to yourself. You believed in me when I was ready to pack it all in and go back into engineering. I realise you didn’t have to spend so much of your own family time, stuck on the phone to me, but such is the guy.

 

I notice you now have your own company and I have to say that most people I know wonder why you didn’t make the move years ago – you can’t avoid being successful Mike, not with the professional skills and personality that you have.

Ok if I call you shortly? – I want to give ADI training a go and you are the obvious choice to guide me through this.”

 

To spare his modesty, we’ll just use Richard’s first name.

I did an Induction session in his home, just over ten years ago, when he and his wife held grave doubts about the merits of embarking on a new career, since Richard was approaching forty-two years old.

 

Well, the weeks passed and Richard duly informed me he had passed his part one Theory Test, one down and two to go; at this point I arranged to book his Part Two test of Driving Ability and book his twelve hours training accordingly.

I was pleasantly surprised at Richard’s driving – smooth and unhurried with a great deal of thought going into it. He planned ahead very well indeed and demonstrated some great defensive driving skills.

The remainder of his training followed in similar fashion, so it was no surprise when Richard passed Part Two at the first attempt.

 

We decided on a short break to “get his breath back” and ‘short’ was the operative word, as Richard called me two days later to discuss his forty hours Part Three training.

 

This proved to be Richard’s Achilles Heel, with role play being the biggest stumbling block for him to grasp. After several attempts, we decided to follow a different route and this I now realise was my first attempt at Coaching, albeit not to my current BTEC standard.

 

As much criticism had been made of the PSTs method of Part Three Training, we decided to adopt an approach involving a deeper concentration on Core Competences, Level of Instruction, Control of the Lesson etc.

That isn’t to say that we neglected ALL of the PST based information though – just not the same emphasis as in the past.

 

Richard found the approach very rewarding and was soon into his stride, identifying – analysing but not always offering remedial action.

I asked him how he would perform each action and he would talk through the process in his usual precise manner.

Eventually, he got to grips with Core Competencies but had a reluctance to “get ahead” of his “pupil” even though an ADIs job is one of prevention as well as identifying faults – the latter can, if we’re not careful, become retrospective instruction.

 

“But I couldn’t pull you up on double yellow lines,” Richard would say.

“No but how could you have alerted me to something that would need attention at the earliest opportunity?”

“I get it, we can’t stop here but when suitable, please stop on the left – we need to discuss your emerge right at the last T-junction,” he offered.

 

The process of “getting ahead” is also one about which Examiners remark to unsuccessful Part Three candidates.

 

Recently, during a Controls Session, I highlighted this in exactly the same way the Examiner had recently done with my candidate in Leicester.

 

Example: Shortly I’ll ask you to remove your seatbelt safely: (Examiner immediately reaches for the buckle) – Not yet! Please wait until I ask you.

 

Example: OK in a moment we’re going to change seats: (Examiner reaches for the door handle) – Wait a moment – first let’s discuss the precautions we should take.

 

Richard successfully negotiated his Part Three Training and to be honest, didn’t think his test prospects were very good at all.

 

The problem was his over instruction during Phase Two of the exam – and that is a subject for next time.

 

If you feel you would benefit from a new career, why not call us at TRISTAR DRIVING? 07581 421415, or visit

http://www.tristardriving.co.uk/driving-instructor-training

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